Category Archives: French

Happy Chocolate Mousse Day!

http-:twocooksonepot.com chocolate mousse

That’s right, April 3rd is Chocolate Mousse Day. I don’t know when it became official, but I sometimes wonder why it isn’t at least as popular as President’s Day. I mean, I understand that we’re lucky to live in a democracy and we have had at least a few great presidents in the history of this country, but Chocolate Mousse Day has chocolate mousse! I think you see my point. Continue reading

Vol-au-Vent | French Pastry Shells

http://twocooksonepot.com/Vol-Au-Vents

Want to impress the heck out of someone? Vol-au-vents are easy to make puff pastry shells that are light as a feather (vol-au-vent is French for flight of air) and impressive as all get out. Did I mention how easy they are to make? Continue reading

Easy Boeuf Bourguignon

Easy Boeuf Bourguignon http://twocooksonepot.com

I have made this Boeuf Bourguignon recipe on a number of occasions over the years and it is sublime. It’s easy and much faster than the original French recipe. However, it is still dark, rich, and wine based with a slow cook style. Slow cooking is very important, a simmer for three to four hours is key. Continue reading

Potato Pancetta Quiche

potato pancetta quiche http://twocooksonepot.com

This dish incorporates so many of my favorite things… potatoes, cheese, breakfast, almost any type of pie…and, it’s fancy enough to impress.

As much as I love pastry, a few months ago I envisioned doing something with a crust of thinly sliced potatoes instead of a traditional pie crust. I was thinking that a cheesecake shaped quiche would be beautiful, so I got one of our trusty spring-form pans, sliced a few spuds, and got to Continue reading

Mustard Chicken – Chicken Dijonnaise

Chicken Dijonnaise

I really should have baked a baguette for this one. Chicken Dijonnaise, or Poulet à la Moutarde, begs to have its tangy, creamy sauce soaked into a fresh hunk of warm bread.

It could be argued that Jean Naigeon is the father of this dish, as well as a few others. In 1856 in Dijon, Burgundy, Naigeon substituted the acidic juice of unripe grapes (verjuice) for vinegar in the traditional mustard recipe. Now white wine is used to make Dijon mustard instead of verjuice and Naigeon is barely a footnote in gastronomic history. That doesn’t seem fair… Continue reading